Evidence-Based and Evidence-Informed Practices

In early 2015, the QIC-CT conducted a review of evidence-based and evidence-informed practices, programs, and interventions for infants, toddlers, and families in the child welfare system. The goal of this research is to help child welfare systems and agencies to increase their capacity to incorporate evidence-based practices to strengthen parenting and promote healthy development for very young children and families involved in child welfare. The QIC-CT’s review of evidence-based and evidence-informed interventions represent only those programs that included children from birth to 3 years old in the target population. 

The point-in-time educational tool and other resources below provide information to support stakeholders in identifying evidence-based and evidence-informed interventions to be implemented in their communities and for infant-toddler court team replication in the future. Accompanying the tool is a resource providing a detailed description of how the review was conducted as well as a decision-making framework comprised of important elements to consider when assessing an intervention’s relevance for the infant and toddler population in child welfare in a community.

NEW: This family-friendly brochure on Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) can be used by a community to help describe what participating in CPP means to families in infant-toddler court teams.

A Review of Evidence-Based Interventions for Families Served by Infant-Toddler Court Teams

 A Review of Evidence-Based Interventions for Families Served by Infant-Toddler Court Teams

A Review of Evidence-Based Interventions for Families Served by Infant-Toddler Court Teams

This point-in-time tool provides information to support stakeholders in identifying evidence-based and evidence-informed interventions to be implemented in their communities and for infant-toddler court team replication in the future. The document presents a printable, PDF version of the spreadsheet above.

A Review of Evidence-Based Interventions for Families Served by Infant-Toddler Court Teams: A Supplementary Resource

This supplement to the tool of evidence-based and informed interventions includes:

  • a detailed description of how the review was conducted;
  • a decision-making framework comprised of important elements to consider when assessing an intervention’s relevance for the infant and toddler population in child welfare in a community; and
  • the diversity-informed tenets from The Irving Harris Foundation that encourage the infant mental health field to engage in standards of practice that promote and strive for a just and equitable society.
Decision-Making Framework for Assessing an Intervention

This framework lays out questions that stakeholders should discuss when assessing an intervention's appropriateness for use with infants, toddlers, and families in the child welfare system in their community.
 

Relevant Resources

Expectant and Parenting Youth in Foster Care: A Resource Guide
The Center for the Study of Social Policy has developed a compendium of evidence-informed programs for meeting the needs of expectant and parenting foster youth and their children. The purpose of this guide is twofold: 1) To enhance the knowledge of evidence-informed and promising practices that address the needs of expectant and parenting youth in foster care and their children 2) To provide a comprehensive set of resources for jurisdictions interested in achieving safety, permanency and well-being for these young families.

An Evidence Framework to Improve Results
In the face of the many obstacles that stand in the way of the progress we all want to see, this publication by the Center for the Study of Social Policy suggests that we can overcome one significant obstacle by expanding our understanding of what constitutes useful and usable evidence. The question addressed in this paper is not whether we need evidence, or even whether we need more evidence. The question explored here is: How do we use a framework of continuous learning to obtain and apply the kinds of evidence that will be most useful in achieving significantly greater outcomes?